So long, FTP.

I’m cashing out the $72 I have in my Full Tilt Poker account. Reason being that the money would probably be better served in a different place. Like, for example, my bank account. I’ve been playing a bit the last few weeks, and although my “bnkrll” (so little I can’t afford to buy vowels) was making a bit of progress, I’ve hit a rough patch as of late and I figured I’d better get out while I still have money in there. As it stands, I’m taking out more money than I put in, so I’m relatively happy. This isn’t me steaming and giving FTP the finger; if there ever comes a point where I have enough disposable income to play again, I’ll probably go back there.

Then again, it’s becoming more and more apparent that I just really, really suck at poker, and have little if any chance of improving my game. I’ve read four different books on the game, including one book that was written specifically for low-limit games, and either I haven’t learned a thing from any of them or I still lost despite what I’ve learned. The sad thing is, if I were to sell the books on eBay, there’s a chance I could make more money that way than I ever did actually playing.

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11 thoughts on “So long, FTP.

  1. rbmkalpha

    Hmm. I guess it really is a “walk a mile in your shoes” sort of situation. It may sound odd, sometimes I kinda get similar concerns. That “what am I doing with my life” sort of thing. Maybe with a different flavor of reaction then you do, though.

    Question is – do you mourn your losses and move on?

    Reply
  2. tleberle

    I don’t buy it. You have a roof over your head, food to eat, and you’re able bodied so you can work. That puts you ahead of 99.99% of the people on earth.

    And you’re complaining about poker.

    Granted, I can see how the whole Charlie Brown bit gets old, but it’s time to dump or get off the pot. You’ve done this before, how long until you go back to poker again? If you want something that has no luck involved…I can’t help you. Everything about life has a little luck to it. Every one of the games I play on Fridays has some element of luck to it.

    If you want to look at the glass half empty, I can’t tell you not to. I, on the other hand, would look at the glass, smile, and chug.

    Reply
  3. loogaroo

    To clarify:

    I’m not getting out of poker because I’m throwing another temper tantrum. I’m getting out because I have a chance to take out more money than I deposited, and don’t want to see said profit disappear on account of bad play.

    So no, the glass isn’t half-empty. It’s totally empty, because I just drank up the whole thing.

    Reply
  4. tleberle

    Then again, it’s becoming more and more apparent that I just really, really suck at poker,

    I’ve heard this one before. Again, lots of games take luck. Poker takes more skill than lots of card games.

    Reply
  5. usasatsui

    If you’re playing poker to make money, you’re looking at it the wrong way. You should play poker to have fun, and any money you drop in should already be considered spent, not an “investment”. By treating gamb;ed money as “yours” that you need to get back, you open yourself up to some serious problems.

    I find most things with any sort of luck involved have a “curve” where you do really well initially thanks to luck (or really bad and quit right away), then learn some strategy and start doing badly again, then doing well. While in the “middle” of the curve, you’ve got the good players hammering on one side, and the lucky ones on the other. It’s not schentific or anything, but it’s an observation.

    Poker strategy books aren’t reliable. You only need one, to tell you the basics. After that, there’s no way they can tell you how to act, because there’s a good chance they’re wrong. Besides, if they were so great, the author would be making money on poker, not on book sales, and if I’ve got a perfect strategy for making millions off of other people, I sure as heck am not gonna publish it, lest others make the money from me.

    Withdrawing your money because you’re not having fun, or because you need the money, is a different call. But none of this “sucks” stuff. You came out with a profit, that’s better than expected. Someone out there is cashing out without the 22 bucks you got from them. 🙂

    Reply
  6. loogaroo

    “I find most things with any sort of luck involved have a “curve” where you do really well initially thanks to luck (or really bad and quit right away), then learn some strategy and start doing badly again, then doing well. While in the “middle” of the curve, you’ve got the good players hammering on one side, and the lucky ones on the other. It’s not schentific or anything, but it’s an observation.”

    I do joke when I’m at the table that “I almost know what I’m doing, which in this game is worse than not having a clue.” 🙂

    Reply
  7. donaldduck5671

    Actually I don’t have a problem with you taking some profits off the table. In fact Jim Cramer would TELL you to do it.

    The Original Man Of The Street.com
    YOU! ME! LET’S TRY TO MAKE SOME MONEY! MAD MONEY!

    Reply

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